Fredrik’s front-end quick read #6

Wikipedia is on a 28KB javascript target diet, Browser engine diversity is ever decreasing, Google has revised its guidelines for rel, console contains a lot more than just .log and last but not least reward yourself with one of Chris Coyier’s merit badges (last article)!

1. Wikipedia’s JavaScript initialization on a budget

As one of the world’s most heavily used sites, Wikipedia wants to keep things running as quickly as possible, including delivering all of their JavaScript within 28KB. Here’s what they’ve done to reach the goal.

https://phabricator.wikimedia.org/phame/live/7/post/175/wikipedia_s_javascript_initialisation_on_a_budget/


2. Browser Engine Diversity

Some thoughts on the decreasing diversity in the browser space: “What we may have lost in browser engine diversity we may gain back in the openness of browser engines and outside players stepping up.”

I wrote about this in Fredrik’s front-end quickread #1 when Microsoft released Microsoft Edge Beta and my mixed feelings about it.

https://phabricator.wikimedia.org/phame/live/7/post/175/wikipedia_s_javascript_initialisation_on_a_budget/


3. Moving beyond console.log() — 8 Console Methods You Should Use When Debugging JavaScript and Node

Includes console.assert, console.count, console.group and two timing methods. Integrate them with your debugging habits and your development speed will increase exponentially!

https://phabricator.wikimedia.org/phame/live/7/post/175/wikipedia_s_javascript_initialisation_on_a_budget/


4. What really matters in Google’s nofollow changes?

For years, web designers who wanted to disavow a site they were linking to used rel=”nofollow” in their link – for example WordPress automatically adds it to comments. Now Google has revised its guidelines and introduced two new values: ”sponsored” and ”ugc”. George Nguyen explains all.

https://searchengineland.com/reaction-to-googles-nofollow-announcement-321816


5. Web Development Merit Badges

What have you done today that made you feel proud? Said “no” to a client, actually used CSS Grid for live code, hand-coded an HTML email? If so, then you’re entitled to a merit badge courtesy of Chris Coyier, who’s put together this hilarious collection for designers and developers.

https://phabricator.wikimedia.org/phame/live/7/post/175/wikipedia_s_javascript_initialisation_on_a_budget/


Thank you for reading and happy coding! ❤️

/Fredrik Ward, Senior front-end developer @ Bouvet and co-creator of Sketch2React

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